Time to “Eggsperiment”

I swear, I am loving this book Melissa Caughey from Tilly’s Nest just came out with! A Kid’s Guide to Keeping Chickens is a fun and creative read to educate yourself and your family about chickens and the do’s and don’ts that come with the fun and loving (sometimes mischievous) birds. The book also has some really cool recipes, fun facts, and eggsperiments! experiment_7 Page 69 is where I stumbled upon a pretty scientific-y, weird project titled “Rubber Eggs”. Has anybody heard of this? Also called “Naked Eggs” or “Shell-less Eggs”. What you do is place a regular egg from your hen in a cup of white vinegar. Within a few days, the vinegar will deplete the shell of calcium. And voila! You have got yourself a rubber egg. Curious of how it works? So was I, so I did some research and this is what I found.. According to Steve Spangler Science, egg shells are made up of calcium carbonate and when the vinegar reacts with this chemical compound, it basically separates the two into individual chemicals. Still with me? Okay, so the calcium part of the compound floats around in the vinegar while the carbonate part reacts to form the bubbles you see forming on the egg (which is considered carbon dioxide gas). IMG_5948

The carbon dioxide gas is what basically eats away at the shell of calcium protecting the egg, and before you know it, your shell is gone. And a rubber egg has taken it’s place. Science is pretty darn cool if you ask me.

I’m going to take my own stab at this over the weekend.  Anyone want to join me?

Updates and fun photos will follow. Join me!

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